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Header Bidding Wins

Just as publishers were beginning to see increased revenues from the 2016 hack called “header bidding,” Google decided to get into the game. For a while, header bidding was a way around Google’s almost total control of real time bidding auctions. But now Google has released its own solution called Exchange Bidding to all publishers who use Doubleclick for Publishers. AdExchanger writes,

Exchange Bidding relies on server-to-server connections, which are faster than the page tags some header bidding solutions rely on, and lower latency improves ad viewability, and thus yield.

It’s also faster to install, with Exchange Bidding essentially a plug-and-play product compared to heavy development and collaboration required of publishers in header-bidding integrations. 

Meredith, an Exchange Bidding beta partner, said it joined because its pages loaded faster and because it consolidated exchange reporting within Google, which reduced measurement discrepancies with advertisers, Chip Schenck, the media conglomerate’s VP of programmatic sales and strategy, told AdExchanger last year.

 

Exchange Bidding, however, can’t be used by buyers who have preferred or guaranteed rates. The new product is only available right now for display ads, although it is useful for mobile web and in-app ads. If you are a publisher who relies on video inventory, this is not for you.

We were one of the first to offer header bidding, and that was about two years ago. Before that, Google  had a near monopoly on the auction market. According to an article in last summer’s Ad Age,  header bidding really shook Google up, and it began offering its own product as a test.  But it immediately ran into resistance, because it was trying to charge a 5% cut for the service. That’s been reconsidered, but in the meantime both Amazon and Facebook have begun to offer their own form of header bidding, forcing Google to play fair.

We think this is good for the industry as a whole, because Google’s monopoly turned out to be costly for publishers. What’s also good for the industry is the convergence among all the once high-flying ad tech companies, who charged publishers for services that did not add value.

This call comes just in time, because eMarketer predicts that 83% of digital spend will transact programmatically by 2019, and by 2020 digital spend will exceed all other forms of advertising spend combined.

The next thing we have to do on behalf of publishers is step up the filtering of non-human traffic and traffic to fake sites, and that is increasingly becoming a priority, especially through the widespread industry adoption of ads.txt.

We’re getting increasingly skillful at weeding out the negatives in our industry and focusing on providing a clean marketplace for digital publishers and demand side players to interact.

 

 

 

 

 

Let Us Help You With Video Header Bidding

Two years ago, header bidding was a hack. Because we like to be a technology innovator, we started offering it as soon as we understood the way to make it work. We were asked for it by our customers, albeit only by a few at first.

Here’s why header bidding works. In the ad serving world, most advertisers want guaranteed impressions and most publishers want decent prices for their inventory. But DFP, by conducting real time auctions with cascading prices,  simply drove prices down, which meant that advertisers might have paid less, but were not guaranteed their impressions either.

When a consumer visits a site, she’s a valuable commodity to an advertiser. So she’s served the best ads first: the ones that are bought direct.  That’s because the ad server brings those up first, because they’re the ads the brand has paid the highest price for in exchange for a guarantee they’ll be seen.

If the consumer stays long enough on the site, she exhausts the “frequency cap” (the number of times the advertiser wants her to see the same ad), and then she starts to see ads bought at auction (RTB) where many more advertisers bid to serve an ad. That produces a cascade of dropping prices for the publisher’s inventory, commonly known as a waterfall.

After a while, people learned that this system really benefitted neither the advertiser nor the publisher. So the hack was to devise an auction outside the ad server in the header of the page. It loads before anything else on the page. The publisher now has control of how much he can charge for your visit. That first impression can be the most expensive for the advertiser, but it is guaranteed.

Publishers who use it have reported 30-60% increased revenue.  For the advertiser, it means the ability to get first look at every single impression, which wasn’t possible otherwise. Advertisers were, in essence, buying blind. Now, whether they win the impression depends on how much they are willing to pay.

This has been a boon for prices in digital advertising altogether. Advertisers who buy through RTB are now on an equal footing with those who buy direct.

Because of the revenue benefits publishers are realizing from header bidding and the premium inventory now available to advertisers even through automated buys, programmatic advertising is finally coming into its own as a potential route to build a brand, and is able to shake off the reputation of being a low-quality, direct-response channel.  Many premium publishers, who only wanted to sell direct before as a way of preserving the value of their inventory are now feeling comfortable moving to programmatic buying. It didn’t take long to see the benefits of better prices combined with more streamlined workflow.

Now, header bidding is almost a standard in the industry.  We thought it might be, and that’s why we developed the methodology for doing it before everyone else.  We even know how to do video header bidding, which most people are still dreaming about!