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The New Fronts Felt Different This Year

The new emphasis on brand safety has done more to change the digital media landscape than anything since the rise of programmatic. It is incumbent on everyone who buys media to know where they’re buying, and on publishers to make sure a brand ad doesn’t appear in an inappropriate place, even though everything is done by algorithms. We predict that the push for brand safety will make random reach less important, and will ultimately give advertisers more knowledge of what they’ve paid for.

Already Chase has cut its buys from 400,000 sites to 5,000 (without seeing a difference in results) and Sir Martin Sorrell’s salary has been cut by a third. Not to put too fine a point on it, the days where ad exchanges could support porn, fake news, and hate sites by selling blind buys to young media buyers whose KPIs were based on numbers of impressions are over. Programmatic be damned, everyone is going to have to know their inventory on the sell side, and agencies are going to have to know what they’ve bought on behalf of a client.

This year’s digital New Fronts, according to Ad Age, were all about safety, rather than sexy. Instead of glitzy parties there was substance, and everyone will be remembering the brand revolts against YouTube and Breitbart. Ad Age’s prediction:

Even if the YouTube brand revolt isn’t explicitly mentioned, everyone from Hulu to PopSugar will take the opportunity to assure marketers that their content is high-caliber and brand-safe. Many are likely to also stress transparency, verification, third-party audits and viewability. 

Conde Nast will send a message to the industry that it needs to trade on brand safety, said Jim Norton, president of revenue and chief business officer, adding that the business has gotten away from that principle.

So many different issues plague the digital advertising industry that it’s difficult to decide what it should fix first.

There is the issue of platform control by Google and Facebook, and the struggle of smaller publishers, even the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, to support themselves off what is left.

Then there are the issues of fraud and malvertising, and the industry’s efforts to clean up the supply chain.

And we haven’t yet talked about the unwillingness of Millennials to watch ads, or on the other hand pay for content on the web.

Follow that by the downloading of ad blockers by 25% of the population, and the rolling out of new privacy rules in the EU,

As for metrics?  The industry is still trying to decide what the best metrics are for mobile advertising, especially for mobile video.

No wonder WPP has decided to cut expenses, especially for Cannes, and to leave Sir Martin with the paltry salary of $62 million this year.

Google at a Crossroads

It all started when the London Times published an investigative piece a couple of weeks ago about ads from prominent brands appearing on terrorist sites and alongside other types of objectionable content. Of course this has been going on for years, at least since the beginning of programmatic buying, but all of a sudden brand safety leapt to the front of advertisers’ consciousness and they began pulling out of Google sites like YouTube and the Google display network. And these are not minor brands; they’re WalMart, Pepsi, Starbucks, Coke and other powerhouses.

Quite often, these little volcanoes erupt in the digital advertising world and brands make noise about something they don’t like. But then the furor dies down and things go back to “normal.” The Wall Street Journal, however, says this is the beginning of something new for the Google ad business, because marketers have been here too many times before, and they really can’t fall back on the excuse that they don’t know what they’re buying. Behind every marketer who may not understand, there’s an agency that does, and the agencies should know better.

Despite Google’s apologies and promise of new tools, ads were still on hate sites, fake sites created by bots, and pornography last week, which prompted the Journal to put a couple of veteran reporters on this lingering story.  CEOs and CMOs of big companies are now involved, and perhaps because of potential implications of being linked to terrorist sites, Google is going to have to make some changes.

And not just Google alone. When you are going for  scale, it is almost impossible to perfectly police what is being bought. Or so it is said. But the research done by the Journal reporters seemed to point to willful blindness. It does seem incredible that big companies, either the advertisers or Google itself, can’t type in some search terms and find out whether their brand ads are still running on hate sites.

This led reporter Suzanne Vranica to say that no one in the industry is really incentivized to fix problems like these when they occur, because everybody gets paid. The publishers get paid, the holding companies try to push as much inventory through these platforms as possible so they’ll get paid, and the advertisers have the advantage of cheap ads. So throughout programmatic’s history, people on all sides of the supply chain have simply looked the other way at ad fraud.

Encouraging terrorism, however, is a horse of a different color, especially after being seen on fake news sites during the election got them worried. Just after fake news subsided as a concern, the fear of seeing your brand in the headlines for funding terrorism arose for these companies, many of whom are public.

Admittedly, in the back of every advertiser’s mind is the reality that they’re getting what they pay for when they buy cheap ads, but that doesn’t mean they won’t turn on Google and Facebook to save their own reputations. They are coming to realize that they helped build these platforms and they are really the people who pay the bills. The walled gardens are not giving them the data they need, and at the end of the day, that’s the main issue. The advertisers ceded their power, and now they are demanding it back.

 

 

ZEDO Launches ZINC Self Service Ad Buying Platform

This week ZINC by ZEDO announced its new ZINC Self Service platform, which allows advertisers and agencies to buy ZINC’s unique advertising. For the advertiser or media buyer who buys on Facebook or Google but who wants to also try something that will stand out more, with the same creative, this self-serve offering will be a real help. Because there is no lengthy process and no contract, the advertisers can even be a small restaurant or a micro-enterprise. This is the first time that the many advertisers that buy on Google and Facebook can also run their existing video or display ads on unique formats that are 100% viewable and really will be seen by users.

ZINC is a better and cost efficient way to build brand on digital because it is 100% viewable and 100% fraud free and only needs existing creative and ZINC innovation in the delivery of the ads.
The new self-service platform makes it easy to buy advertising and pay using a credit card – without wasting time. Once a campaign is set, the buyer receives regular reports of performance. The reports are updated in real time – every fifteen minutes.

The ZINC platform allows buyers to target ads to the IAB contextual categories of publishers. Targeting is determined by the text content of the page on which the user is seeing the ad. The buyer can set a daily budget, or a lifetime budget, and target a specific geography. She can also add a title and description to the ads to give users more context, which attracts the right users to see or click on the ad.  Further precision targeting is offered through choices that include banner or video formats running on mobile or desktop, delivered like native ads to improve the campaign’s performance and provide a higher ROI.

ZINC Self Serve provides the same safeguards to the advertiser’s brand, ensuring ads are always served on 100% bot-free brand safe environments, that we provide to our large clients. We are the first choice of advertisers who are already buying on Facebook, because with little effort they get advertising that really makes them stand out from their competitors.

For Viewability and Brand Safety Advertisers Choose ZEDO Ad Server

In a market of incomplete information, you can claim anything. That’s how ads are called “viewable” when they really are not. As a buyer of ads, especially a buyer who is buying on a real-time bidding (RTB) platform,  you could be buying anything. In this scenario, the best case is that the ad isn’t seen. The worst case is that it is seen someplace you didn’t intend it to go.

This is going to be especially true on video pages, which are heavy traffic draws. If you as an advertiser are buying for reach, you are probably buying on numbers of impressions. But your ad is likely to go through four or five networks from the one on which you bought it to the site where it actually runs. And all of this is done in near-real time, by algorithms untouched by human hands.

Sure, there’s ad verifying software, and it helps a bit, but the ad verifiers often can’t see the ads either. They claim that they can see through iframes to the actual place an ad appears, but most browsers no longer allow that. Instead, those verifiers may generate dummy impressions, for which you have to pay. The more networks and exchanges that get between advertiser and publisher, the less it is possible with current browsers to “jump the frames” and tell where the ad is appearing.

Publishers are beginning to install code so their own inventory can be identified. Otherwise the advertiser has paid, but the publisher may not receive the revenue.

In a perfect world where a publisher sells directly to a trading desk, ads can be verified. How often does THAT happen nowadays? We’re trying to make that happen at ZEDO by assuring advertisers who buy ZINC formats to run on our ZEDO premium network that there will be no other middlemen, and that they will not be buying programmatically but buying direct. In the past few years, we’ve put a great deal of time and effort, as well as research and development, into developing a  network that can assure ad buyers reach, without sacrificing safety. In this way, our publishers also stand to combat the falling prices sometimes attributed to programmatic buying.