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Does Advertising Really Need so Much Tracking?

Our old friend Doc Searls is taking another step toward putting readers in charge of their data and taking on the use of too much consumer tracking. In a prototype edition of the reborn Linux Journal, he is going ask readers to indicate what they want in their advertising:

We believe the only cure is code that gives publishers ways to do exactly what readers want, which is not to bare their necks to adtech’s fangs every time they visit a website.

We’re doing that by reversing the way terms of use work. Instead of readers always agreeing to publishers’ terms, publishers will agree to readers’ terms. The first of these will say something like this:

That appeared on a whiteboard one day when we were talking about terms readers proffer to publishers. Let’s call it #DoNotByte. Like others of its kind, #DoNotByte will live at Customer Commons, which will do for personal terms what Creative Commons does for personal copyright.

Publishers and advertisers can both accept that term, because it’s exactly what advertising has always been in the offline world, as well as in the too-few parts of the online world where advertising sponsors publishers without getting too personal with readers.

Notice he is not anti-advertising as a business model. He is for restoring advertising to what it used to be — brand advertising. He refers to data-driven advertising as “junk mail.”

He theorizes that we’ve (publishers) lost a lot here by putting data collection in the driver’s seat:

By now you’re probably wondering how adtech has come to displace real advertising online. As I put it in “Separating Advertising’s Wheat and Chaff”, “Madison Avenue fell asleep, direct response marketing ate its brain, and it woke up as an alien replica of itself.” That happened because Madison Avenue, like the rest of big business, developed a big appetite for “big data”, starting in the late 2000s. (I unpack this history in my EOF column in the November 2015 issue of Linux Journal.)

Madison Avenue also forgot what brands are and how they actually work. After a decade-long trial by a jury that included approximately everybody on Earth with an internet connection, the verdict is in: after a $trillion or more has been spent on adtech, no new brand has been created by adtech; nor has the reputation of an existing brand been enhanced by adtech. Instead adtech does damage to a brand every time it places that brand’s ad next to fake news or on a crappy publisher’s website.

Yes, Doc is a friend of ZEDO.  But he is also a terrific writer, and you owe it to yourself as a publisher or a member of our ecosystem to read what he has to say in Linux Journal.

2018: The Year of Data Security

It doesn’t take much to predict that 2018 will be the year of enhanced online security. We were headed toward more emphasis on consumer privacy anyway, but the massive Equifax data breach forced every consumer to face what geeks have known for ages: that left to their own devices, the companies that collect, handle and sell our data do not care about keeping us safe. We have to be in charge of our own data security. This event will change the thinking of just about every American on the internet, and since the Europeans already relish their privacy and have begun to take steps to enhance it, we can look forward to a real difference in how marketers, developers, and publishers operate online.

Here’s what we think will happen in 2018:

  1. Apple, which has made security a differentiator in its products for a long time, will block cookies automatically in Safari 11.  All the major marketing trade groups are fighting this, saying they are “deeply concerned” with Apple’s plan to override and replace user cookie preferences with a set of Apple’s own standards. This is called “Intelligent Tracking Prevention,” will provide consumers the gift of a 24-hour limit on ad retargeting. So that pair of shoes can only follow you around on the internet for 24 hours.
  2. A new browser, Brave, developed by the inventor of Javascript and the former CEO of Mozilla, loads news sits two to eight times faster than Chrome or Firefox by blocking ads and trackers by default. Through Brave’s use of blockchain technology, it pays content creators viewed through its browser in micro payments.  The block chain is coming to advertising in other use cases as well, mostly to make the digital media supply chain more transparent. We predict Brave will catch on with the geeks who favor ad blocking and security, although the general public probably won’t know it exists.
  3. The big Kahuna of changes is the launch of the Global Data Privacy Regulation in May 2018.  The GDPR, as it is lovingly referred to, affects how marketers can interact with European consumers: they can only market to a consumer who gives permission. Because this regulation was passed by the European Commission, it carries the force of law and if you violate its terms you can be liable for a hefty fine.

Although the UK is in the process of Brexiting the EU, because its companies handle so much data from EU members it will follow the conventions of the GDPR.  America will be dragged along kicking and screaming, because most online businesses do not have a convenient window into where every data point comes from, it will be easiest simply to comply.

4. There will be a major business opportunity here as small businesses who haven’t paid much attention to these issues in the past re-examine how they handle customer data or who they partner with.

5. And then there’s the obvious windfall for companies that sell data security solutions, which will not be far more appealing.

There may also be a change in advertising from an emphasis on performance ads based on data to brand ads, which do not involve having to violate privacy by tracking consumers around the web.

 

 

 

 

Brand Ads Work

It is not necessary to stalk a tiny audience to get results. Brand advertising, with good creative and a high degree of creative works even better, without offending viewers. We believe publishers should encourage their advertisers to offer better creative, which will then pull people to their sites as less comfortable techniques never will. Publishers need to get in a partnership with their ad partners, agencies need to stress creative, and the ad industry as an entirety ought to move back to brand advertising.

Although this year’s SuperBowl game was indeed worth watching in its own right, several people have commented in our social media feeds that they “teared up” during SuperBowl ads, specifically the Coca Cola ad. When was the last time you heard somebody mention an emotional reaction to an ad?

The NYT summary of the ads revealed how powerful they can be:

• Coca-Cola and Airbnb were seen as making political statements on Sunday with ads that touched on immigration and diversity.

• People were searching Google for ads from Budweiser and 84 Lumber and those starring Justin Timberlake and Justin Bieber.

• Fox and the N.F.L. have been trying to avoid overtly political ads, with Fox deeming one commercial “too controversial” last month for featuring a border wall — but that’s tough to do in today’s environment.

We cannot repeat this often enough. It isn’t advertising per se that people try to block. It’s ads that have no relevance to their lives.

SuperBowl ads are not finely targeted. They are simply targeted to the audience watching the SuperBowl, or even to an audience that doesn’t care much about the game, but cares about the sheer creativity invested in the ads, and will go find them online. The best example of that was the 84 Lumber ad. Who had heard of 84 Lumber before yesterday? And who would run a performance ad for a construction company?

But that’s not what 84 Lumber did. The company had three goals for the ad: One was to generate awareness, the second was to position 84 Lumber as an employer of choice, and the third  was to attract talent  to fill the number of positions 84 Lumber has open over the course of the year, its chairman and CEO said. The ad turned out to be more political after President Trump passed the immigration ban, and its ending had to be altered because Fox wouldn’t run the original, but the altered ad functioned as intended.

Let’s call this a cross-channel promotion, since SuperBowl ads can now be viewed outside the game itself. The ad was viewed 4,000,000 times on YouTube before the game, and the company’s site received 6,000,000 requests in the hour after the ad ran. The site was swamped. The ad accomplished its objectives, because now everybody knows who 84 Lumber is and what it stands for.