The New Fronts Felt Different This Year

The new emphasis on brand safety has done more to change the digital media landscape than anything since the rise of programmatic. It is incumbent on everyone who buys media to know where they’re buying, and on publishers to make sure a brand ad doesn’t appear in an inappropriate place, even though everything is done by algorithms. We predict that the push for brand safety will make random reach less important, and will ultimately give advertisers more knowledge of what they’ve paid for.

Already Chase has cut its buys from 400,000 sites to 5,000 (without seeing a difference in results) and Sir Martin Sorrell’s salary has been cut by a third. Not to put too fine a point on it, the days where ad exchanges could support porn, fake news, and hate sites by selling blind buys to young media buyers whose KPIs were based on numbers of impressions are over. Programmatic be damned, everyone is going to have to know their inventory on the sell side, and agencies are going to have to know what they’ve bought on behalf of a client.

This year’s digital New Fronts, according to Ad Age, were all about safety, rather than sexy. Instead of glitzy parties there was substance, and everyone will be remembering the brand revolts against YouTube and Breitbart. Ad Age’s prediction:

Even if the YouTube brand revolt isn’t explicitly mentioned, everyone from Hulu to PopSugar will take the opportunity to assure marketers that their content is high-caliber and brand-safe. Many are likely to also stress transparency, verification, third-party audits and viewability. 

Conde Nast will send a message to the industry that it needs to trade on brand safety, said Jim Norton, president of revenue and chief business officer, adding that the business has gotten away from that principle.

So many different issues plague the digital advertising industry that it’s difficult to decide what it should fix first.

There is the issue of platform control by Google and Facebook, and the struggle of smaller publishers, even the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, to support themselves off what is left.

Then there are the issues of fraud and malvertising, and the industry’s efforts to clean up the supply chain.

And we haven’t yet talked about the unwillingness of Millennials to watch ads, or on the other hand pay for content on the web.

Follow that by the downloading of ad blockers by 25% of the population, and the rolling out of new privacy rules in the EU,

As for metrics?  The industry is still trying to decide what the best metrics are for mobile advertising, especially for mobile video.

No wonder WPP has decided to cut expenses, especially for Cannes, and to leave Sir Martin with the paltry salary of $62 million this year.