Mobile Video Ads Play Without Sound

At first, publishers were excited about auto-play video, and video ads also played with the volume turned up.  But we quickly found out the audiences did not want volume on in their offices, so we developed our inArticle (a.k.a. outstream) format to run without sound. As usual, everyone is now following our lead. A new study has revealed that 85% of video content runs without sound, especially if it is on Facebook. Even the ads. Facebook hosts up to 8 billion video views daily, and most of them are without sound. It’s as if we were returning to the era of silent, captiond movies.

We’re curious about the future of mobile video ads in this environment. At present, they command high CPMs from advertisers, but the ROI hasn’t bee determined yet. According to an eMarketer study, the pace of mobile video advertising will double by 2019. However, publishers and platforms are making what eMarketer calls “egregious errors” that turn off watchers.

Advertisers are guilty of the most obvious video errors, but publishers and platform providers sometimes share the blame. Among the more egregious offenses are serving the same video pre-roll multiple times during a content series, forcing long-form ads ahead of short-form videos, reusing video spots without regard to screen aspect ratios, and autoplaying—with audio!—without the user’s permission.

Almost any advertiser worth their salt knows that these lackluster experiences won’t deliver the desired results. And yet bad user experience is, if not the rule, certainly more than mere exception.

This is exceptionally true with Facebook, which now shares with Google as much as 80% of mobile ad spend.

Tailoring content to the whims of the Facebook news feed has helped publishers scale on the platform. It’s also turned news feeds stale as publishers put up countless videos that have the same look and feel. Take, for instance, this NowThis video about a Tylenol ingredient that makes people less empathetic and this Tech Insider video about a futuristic bike. While they focus on completely different topics, the key ingredients are the same: a striking visual or message up front followed by a text-heavy explanation of the content.

One thing that does work well on Facebook is branded content, even if it is silent. So at the moment, brands are flocking to that way to get their messages out. Another word for branded content, although often abused, is “native” advertising. And our Innovative Formats work well for that. We  just hope advertisers stick to a high quality standard for their branded content, so that it, too, doesn’t alientate customers.