Malvertising Raises Questions About Ad Blocking

ota-2015-logoA recent Buzzfeed article totals up the recent loss of jobs in digital media as publications struggle to adjust to new market forces. Because of the dominance of Facebook and Snapchat, media organizations that once hoped to make it at scale have cut back to pursue niches, which we believe is the best strategy for the present. But even niche publications have to contend with malvertising and poor delivery of ads to mobile devices.

However, other headwinds are also hitting the publishing industry. On Medium this week Rob Leathern, long-time digital advertising critic, wrote that crummy ads (he used other language) cost iPhone users $8 billion in data charges last year.

We ran across 7 websites for 3 minutes, and loaded 1712 URLs on average, whereas the top 10 blockers on average needed just 493 calls to render all the content and images on these sites -> this means that advertising technology accounts for 71% (1,228 hidden items loaded) what loads on your mobile phone in an average web session! I think that’s just crazy, and hard to justify for the small amount of advertising revenue most sites are making off of us.

Focus on the last sentence. Consumers are spending the money for data, advertisers are paying for ads, but publishers are still not making any money. Fortunately, mobile consumers are still not blocking ads in the numbers desktop consumers are, and we can fix this problem if we hurry.

We’ve been heavily involved in the Online Trust Association (OTA) for years, and we are working on the Advertising Integrity Committee this year.  This morning the organization sent around an article about a massive malware infestation in the Netherlands:

As of Monday, at least 288 websites had been infected with malvertising, exposing millions to poisoned ads.

One example of how far its tentacles have reached: the campaign has hit Nu.nl, the most-visited Dutch-language news portal.

Nu.nl alone is estimated to have scored more than 50 million visitors in March, according to Tech Week Europe.

Other affected sites include eBay-style service Marktplaats.nl and well-known news and culture sites, according to Fox-IT.

The campaign originated in an advertising platform used by the affected sites

OTA is worried that consumers might respond to this by blocking ads, which the organization does not feel is a suitable solution, because most ad blocking software is itself untrustworthy. Most of it has white lists or allow lists that do not block advertising and are increasingly being used by consumers as ad vectors.

In our own case, we have created a private buying platform for our publishers that does not admit malware and is very closely monitored to refuse to serve questionable sites.  Working with both the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) and the OTA, we’re engaged in being as much a part of the solution as we can.  We can only do our best to lure back angry consumers.