IAB: Independent Publishers Can Compete Against Facebook

Randall Rothenberg, CEO of IAB, is getting more and more outspoken in his comments about the state of digital advertising, especially since the ANA’s second report and guidelines were issued. Rothenberg blames most of the industry’s problems on brand marketers who value price over performance.  He says marketers still don’t have the in-house expertise to understand the new landscape, and urges them to get tech savvy right away. His theory is that marketers who are out of step with the new advertising environment have bought or subscribed  to ad tech software that has denigrated the user experience to the point where visitors are using available tools to deal with unwelcome intrusions. The marketing is no longer correctly targeted, and the buys are made for price rather than for true relevance to the consumer.

He also thinks that non-savvy marketers need to quit subscribing to the meme that Facebook and Google have most of the audience and that they are the only “safe” buy.

“One of the reasons you’re seeing a reliance on a handful of players is they’re seeking safe havens. Back in the old days nobody got fired for buying IBM. Now nobody got fired for buying Google and Facebook.”

He also says that marketers are also to blame for ad fraud and lack of ROI because for years they have looked the other way.

“It’s either a willful shirking of their responsibility to understand the work of their vendors and their vendors’ vendors, or it’s a wink-wink, nudge-nudge to offload responsibility in their quest for ever-lower prices.”

Rothenberg feels that individual publishers can compete effectively against Google and Facebook by gaining absolute knowledge of their audiences from the standpoint of both data and content development. While Google and Facebook have large audiences, they have less information about niche audiences, and that’s where independent publishers have an edge. He likens this period in the advertising industry to the time when three networks had all the dollars, just before the cable industry came to power.

We have always insisted that the power of publishers with niche audiences will continue to grow, if they market their sites correctly, using Facebook only as a tool.  The growth of new sites like Thrillist or Mic, run by savvy internet marketers, who have either used Facebook to drive traffic to their own sites, or who have built communities around their audiences, is instructive. And so are the biker sites, pet sites, travel sites where communities of users make great audiences for the right brands.