Facebook Faces Competition from Snapchat

On the day Snap, Inc.(SNAP), the parent company of Snapchat, became a public company, its stock soared 44 per cent.  That’s because Snapchat reaches a demographic everyone wants to reach: young people who are just forming allegiances to brands. But it’s also because there’s a dirty little secret out there: Facebook advertising doesn’t work.

The Copyranter blog from Digiday says it best:

 You know who knows better than anybody that Facebook advertising doesn’t work? Facebook! Of course they do! All that proprietary data they’ve got on 1.8 billion people, they know pretty much everything about brands, consumers, and interactions between the two. That’s an unprecedented level of lying, even in the skeevy ad industry. Or maybe you think this is all just conspiratory “truther” talk?

We’ve always loved Copyranter because he calls it like he sees it. Last fall Facebook ran into trouble three different times over incorrect or incomplete numbers:

Facebook has always been very purposely opaque and doesn’t share its methodology and algorithms with anyone, which makes it impossible for anyone to do any objective reporting — or regulating — of those numbers.

Then last September, right about the time it was announcing that its first three quarters profit was near $6 billion, up from $3.69 billion in 2015, it also reported a big whoopsie: It had been inflating video view numbers by 60-80 percent (94 percent in Australia).

Facebook has now been forced by P&G at least to allow third parties in to verify its numbers, and perhaps that will help. But Facebook has done its job: it has soaked up advertising dollars not only without producing accurate and verifiable returns, but with at the same time destroying the creativity that made brand ads bearable for viewers. Facebook does not have engaging formats; its entire value proposition is targeting. Well, guess what? It’s difficult to engage attention without creative, especially on a site where people do not come to buy.

The shift from brand advertising to direct advertising that accompanied the dream of “metrics” has forced advertising agencies and brands to change their models and their goals. No longer do we expect advertising to create either brand lift or sales — instead we show the boss meaningless metrics, such as Facebook “likes.” At the end of the day, those do not move the sales needle.

On the other hand, Snapchat filters are really countable; when a person sends a snap with a sponsored filter, that person has actually made a choice to engage with a brand. It’s a very different energy from the energy used to click on “like” on Facebook.

We’re watching publishers drift away from Facebook live, and we predict they will continue to drift away from Facebook as it continues to fail both the sell side and the buy side.