DMA Calls Ad Blockers Bad Choice for Consumers

The Direct Marketing Association has called ad blockers a bad consumer choice, based on the learnings it gleaned from the beginning of email marketing. DMA has now begun to offer advice to the media industry based on those experiences. In the early days of direct marketing, mistakes were made, leading to the passage of the CAN-SPAM act of 2003, the first set of regulations for the use of commercial email. This law establishes the rules for commercial email and commercial messages, gives recipients the right to have a business stop emailing them, and outlines the penalties incurred for those who violate the law.

Consumers now feel about digital advertising the way they felt about unwanted email (CAN-SPAM stands for Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography And Marketing), and have begun letting marketers know in such large numbers that the government might feel it has to step in.

But that doesn’t make blocking ads the best answer.Comparing ad blocking in 2016 to the email industry before 2003, Neil O’Keefe, SVP of CRM and Customer Engagement for the DMA told Bloomberg TV viewers that adblocking was a significant problem, because the only entity that really benefited from it was the maker of the ad blocking software. He went on to say that it disconnects brands from consumers, and creates problems for the entire marketplace.Marketers need two-way communication with customers in order to inform product development. And customers need their end of the conversation in order to have choice about which brands they want to hear from. With ad blocking they no longer hear about the best new products and about optimum pricing.

O’Keefe believes that ad blocking is a call to arms to deliver better ads. Like the DMA, which tightened its own self-regulation and education programs and actually created an environment where consumers today often prefer email to display ads, he says we have to fight ad blocking with quality ads that are relevant to customers. That is the best consumer choice.

Two other industry leaders came out over the past two weeks with very insightful comments regarding the state of online marketing:

GroupM announced it wouldn’t pay for ads that are re-inserted, declaring “It’s addressing the symptom, not the cause. Let’s fix the user experience first.”
And Sir Martin Sorrell of WPP points out that we haven’t adapted to the smaller screen, but still cautions that there is a price for the consumer to pay for ad blocking: the higher cost of content.

As with every move forward in our industry, the technological changes continue to come with much discussion before settling out into industry best practices.