Context Becomes More Important in Flight to Quality

After content, context is now king. One of the reasons Facebook and Google advertising  have captured so much of the digital ad market is that they, especially Google, are able to target ads according to keywords. AdSense and Facebook use different methodologies, but they’re both known for their precise targeting. They have glaring weaknesses, however, especially as more and more digital advertising is video.

With video ads it is still a major problem is that so many ads run without context, even though they may be closely “targeted” to a demographic or a geography. They still run without context, because we don’t quite have the tools yet –nor the will– to provide video context totally programmatically.  Especially on YouTube there are many instances where we’re increasingly seeing pre-roll and mid-roll that has nothing to do with what the audience is actually wanting to see. This is not a plea for the old TV practices of selling sweetened cereal to youthful audiences, but a heads up to brands who care about “delighting” rather than alienating their customers.

A golden age is coming for contextual advertising, as a result of two things: 1) the realization on the part of brands that they’re threatened by Amazon and other services, and 2) the propensity of younger audiences to require corporations to reveal their values. To encourage brand loyalty, marketers will have to do what they should have been doing all along: buying travel ads on travel sites. sports ads on sports sites.

If you throw in the effects of GDPR, as a potential third motivator, we believe it is becoming increasingly important to brands to understand where their ads are appearing, as well as who the publications’s audience is. If I’m looking to fix my truck and I’m about to watch a video about suspension problems, I might be a millennial  in the midwest and white, but ads for sports, hot dogs, or video games are merely an interruption. Let me just watch how this guy replaces his front suspension so I can do the same thing to my truck.

What if I could see an ad for the right car parts,  for local mechanics, or even for new trucks? This is called contextual advertising, and back in the day when more ads were sold direct, as a media buyer I could be sure I was getting  that kind of context. As an advertiser, that would give me much greater potential ROI. It would also fix that feeling most consumers have that they’d just as soon skip the irrelevant ad as soon as possible.

We’re making an appeal to the digital ad industry to think before buying and selling ads programmatically without context. One of the reasons consumers no longer tolerate advertising its its lack of relevance to the moment they are in. And that doesn’t have to be the case. With all the tools we have at our disposal — artificial intelligence, mounds of first party data, and great programmatic services, there’s no reason why we can’t do better. Both publishers and consumers deserve that.