Zedo adding iPad slots to ad exchange

Zedo adding iPad slots to ad exchange

newsandtech.com
April 25, 2011
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San Francisco advertising software and production firm Zedo said it is adding iPad advertising to its ZINC advertising exchange.

The service, for the time being offered in beta, is a reflection of the growing number of iPad users as well as the increasing number of papers launching iPad apps, said ZINC Product Manager Ivan Yakovenko.

“With 7 million people using the iPad to visit newspaper sites today there is a huge and fast growing opportunity for advertisers and agencies,” he said in a statement.

ZINC, which launched earlier this month, allows marketers to view newspapers’ online advertising inventory and then buy space through a single online interface.

It’s similar to Q-Exchange, an online hub created in February by QuadrantOne and its partners Tribune Co., Gannett Co. Inc., Hearst Corp. and The New York Times Co.

The company said it will release additional details about its service offerings to newspapers in the coming weeks.

Interview: Zedo CEO Roy de Souza Discusses Ad Exchanges in the Current Marketplace

Interview: Zedo CEO Roy de Souza Discusses Ad Exchanges in the Current Marketplace

adoperationsonline.com
May 16, 2011
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As part of our “Experts Talk” series of interviews, we have asked Roy de Souza, co-founder and CEO of Zedo, to clarify a few aspects on how ad exchanges work and where they are heading to nowadays.

Otilia Otlacan: Ad exchanges are a hot topic these days, and, as you so clearly explained 1, they may overtake ad networks in terms of agency buys. Still, there are many in the online media arena who aren’t too sure on the difference between the two. To start with, could you give our readers a clarification on what distinguishes an ad exchange from an ad network?
Roy de Souza: An advertiser can think of an exchange as an Amazon.com type site that sells advertising space. Agencies go there, see what ad space is available and buy it.

Otilia Otlacan: There is a gap – at least a perceived one – between technologies employed by ad exchanges and those commonly seen in ad networks. Do you think this is indeed the case, and if so, what could be the driver for the discrepancy?
Roy de Souza: Ad networks were usually started by great sales teams. They are very good at selling to agencies. That is their strength. Ad Exchanges like DoubleClick Exchange, ZINC Exchange and OpenX Exchange were started by ad serving companies. Ad serving companies are sophisticated and technology companies with huge scale. An exchange is sophisticated technology that also offers the ability to buy ad space – so even more complex technology. As the the industry started seeing advantages from exchanges, it was far easier for the ad serving companies to build an exchange than for the excellent sales reps to start writing software.

Otilia Otlacan: We have seen how beneficial ad exchanges could be for large media buyers. What about publishers, what’s in the store for them?
Roy de Souza: Publishers can and should benefit too. And they will. Currently most ad exchanges sell only remnant space. They don’t pay the publishers much more than remnant ad networks so publishers don’t benefit much. However new premium exchanges such as ZINC Ad Exchange sell premium not remnant. They get high prices for the publishers and the publishers will benefit. Because there are so many advertisers across the world the premium exchanges will find them and bring new advertisers and money to publishers.

Otilia Otlacan: While still in the publishers’ zone, what is your take on yield optimization companies vs. ad exchanges? Are yield optimizers morphing into ad exchanges?
Roy de Souza: Yes. Yield optimization companies are good at optimizing remnant space. They are morphing into remnant exchanges that sell remnant space on an auction basis.

Otilia Otlacan: You have launched ZINC – Zedo’s own ad exchange – three months ago. What differentiates ZINC form other ad exchanges? Could you share with us what’s on ZINC’s roadmap for this year?
Roy de Souza: ZINC has been launched in private beta. It is for advertisers and agencies that want 100% transparency and guaranteed impression delivery. It sells only professionally created content sites in the news vertical. It also sells new ad types that are noticed by users. Agencies love the UI and the efficiencies from automating their media planning and buying. They are impressed that before buying they can see full availability data, prices and unique users their media plan will reach. This type of inventory is very attractive to agencies that are launching a new product or service or trying to make a big impact. The ad space is a little more expensive than remnant but agencies find that their clients are very happy with the results. Later this year we will add more high quality sites, add further innovative ad types (one on the iPad) and more targeting options like day parting. We will also launch ZINC internationally as we are seeing demand from agencies outside the US.

ZEDO To Launch Online Ad Exchange Zinc In India

ZEDO To Launch Online Ad Exchange Zinc In India

News.taaza.com
August 26, 2011
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Zedo, a digital ad serving solutions company, has soft launched Zinc, an online ad exchange for publishers and media buyers, reports The Hindu Businessline. The ad exchange is currently under an invite only, beta phase, and will be launched in September.

ZEDO To Launch Online Ad Exchange Zinc In India

ZEDO To Launch Online Ad Exchange Zinc In India

Medianama.com
August 26, 2011
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Zedo, a digital ad serving solutions company, has soft launched Zinc, an online ad exchange for publishers and media buyers, reports The Hindu Businessline. The ad exchange is currently under an invite only, beta phase, and will be launched in September.

While conventional ad networks sell remnant non-guaranteed impressions – if you ask a publisher, an ad network is likely to be their last recourse – Zedo claims that the Zinc Exchange will feature only premium, guaranteed inventory for advertisers, and look to cater to newspaper publishers, and offer high-visibility, premium advertising positions. Frankly, we don’t see how Zinc can guarantee that – isn’t it up to a publisher to determine which inventory to put up for sale on an exchange?

It is probably that since Zedo has been deployed by many publishers to serving advertising, Zinc comes in and allows publishers an alternative advertisement to put in a spot, which means that it might again get relegated to a remnant inventory sale, despite Zedo’s claims. Zedo probably hopes that Publishers might use the open-bidding format of an ad exchange to enable price discovery as well. Unlike an ad exchange, ad networks tend to be blind, offering publishers limited control over inventory. Ironically, ad networks also use Ad exchanges extensively to fill in their remnant inventory. Yahoo owned Right Media is a clear example of competition. Anyone remember Reliance Entertainment’s never-launched ad exchange/ad network Kyphy?

ZEDO To Launch Online Ad Exchange Zinc In India

ZEDO To Launch Online Ad Exchange Zinc In India

Oneindia.in
August 26, 2011
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Zedo, a digital ad serving solutions company, has soft launched Zinc, an online ad exchange for publishers and media buyers, reports The Hindu Businessline. The ad exchange is currently under an invite only, beta phase, and will be launched in September.

While conventional ad networks sell remnant non-guaranteed impressions – if you ask a publisher, an ad network is likely to be their last recourse – Zedo claims that the Zinc Exchange will feature only premium, guaranteed inventory for advertisers, and look to cater to newspaper publishers, and offer high-visibility, premium advertising positions. Frankly, we don’t see how Zinc can guarantee that – isn’t it up to a publisher to determine which inventory to put up for sale on an exchange?

It is probably that since Zedo has been deployed by many publishers to serving advertising, Zinc comes in and allows publishers an alternative advertisement to put in a spot, which means that it might again get relegated to a remnant inventory sale, despite Zedo’s claims. Zedo probably hopes that Publishers might use the open-bidding format of an ad exchange to enable price discovery as well. Unlike an ad exchange, ad networks tend to be blind, offering publishers limited control over inventory. Ironically, ad networks also use Ad exchanges extensively to fill in their remnant inventory. Yahoo owned Right Media is a clear example of competition. Anyone remember Reliance Entertainment’s never-launched ad exchange/ad network Kyphy?

Zedo launches Online Ad Exchange – Zinc

Zedo launches Online Ad Exchange – Zinc

imediaconnection.in
August 26, 2011
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Zedo’s online ad exchange for Indian publishers, Zinc will go live in September. This will be first of its kind online exchange in India where online ad inventory is currently sold through ad networks, or like traditional advertising inventory- individually, by media owners, to media planners and buyers for the use of their clients, confirms Roy De Souza, CEO and co-founder of Silicon Valley firm Zedo (1999) and Managing Director of Zinc India to Hindu Business line exclusively.

He states that “One of two trends that have sparked the birth of Zinc India is that ‘ad networks are globally dying and so in India’. The other, according to De Souza, is that “brand advertisers are losing interest in social networks and moving their ads to ‘premium content’ such as newspapers’ Web sites”.

While ad exchanges such as Zinc India exist in developed markets, Zedo has chosen the Indian market to launch in first to leverage its equity with publishers here. According to Zedo’s co-founder, publishers already using its technology are working on the pricing of different inventory options, and would be willingly migrated to the Zinc India platform. Those not using Zedo technology are being asked to switch one unit of their online inventory on to Zinc India’s Web site to start with.

A new office will be set up for Zinc India, replete with a new CEO and team. In India, Zedo has chosen to start a new company to run the exchange, given its confidence in the scope the market provides.

Zinc India will offer media planners the advantage of information from a variety of publisher sites with news content on one platform. Based on news published in Hindu Business line.

ZEDO Taps Highwinds CDN For Performance-Based Load Balancing Solution

ZEDO Taps Highwinds CDN For Performance-Based Load Balancing Solution

(San Francisco, Calif., and Mumbai, India – Feb. 27, 2012) – ZEDO, Inc., the leading independent advertising technology partner for publishers, today announced that it is using SelectPath™ multi-platform load balancing technology from content delivery network (CDN) provider Highwinds® to optimize content delivery across multiple CDNs and platforms.  SelectPath, which is integrated into ZEDO’s ad platforms, combines advanced multi-platform network monitoring and CDN load balancing to fuel real-time data-driven content delivery decisions.  ZEDO’s single, unified platform with SelectPath improves performance and increases fault tolerance for customers’ ads.

“We chose SelectPath because it is a unique and cutting-edge technology that allows us to load balance multiple CDNs based on performance.  Other vendors that we talked to could do this on geography alone.  SelectPath integrated into our ad platforms improves delivery performance and reliability,” said Joseph Jacob, CTO of ZEDO, a 12-year-old advertising technology company, the largest independent ad server and an industry thought leader.  “With SelectPath, ZEDO is the first in the industry to be able to CDN load balance based on performance rather than geography.”

Companies like ZEDO use multiple CDNs for many reasons, most of which are driven by the need to deliver the best experience every time to every user.  Highwinds SelectPath, which includes licensed technology from multi-cloud performance and automation pioneer, Cedexis, is well-positioned to help content providers meet performance goals.  It collects real-time performance data directly from actual end users across any number of CDNs as well as the provider’s own origin, and it captures valuable last-mile data often excluded from monitoring services.  SelectPath reacts to the data by dynamically adjusting loads and automatically routing content over the CDN performing best at the moment of delivery.  Highwinds customers can also use SelectPath to create custom rules that programmatically flow content based on geography, time of day, day of month, etc.

“SelectPath is rooted in two premises.  First, we’ve seen third-party data consistently showing that Highwinds CDN outperforms others, and not surprisingly, since we’ve invested heavily into our infrastructure and software stack to ensure our seat at the top.  And second, because we agree that performance matters, SelectPath will steer all content in the direction of the optimally performing CDN, even if it’s not ours,” said Steve Miller, chairman and CEO of Highwinds.  “We commend ZEDO for their recognition that no one CDN is ever faster than the aggregate, and we are excited to support ZEDO’s multi-CDN approach – while earning their bytes on a performance basis.”

To learn more about SelectPath, visit www.highwinds.com/cdn/load-balancing.php.

ABOUT HIGHWINDS

Highwinds is a content delivery, network and cloud-based IP services business that offers a comprehensive suite of CDN solutions, including content storage and IP software.  The company delivers content and rich media over its high-performance RollingThunder® network to millions of global users every day.  Highwinds CDN customers gain unprecedented command and control with its StrikeTracker® console and open APIs.  Highwinds is headquartered in Winter Park, Fla., and maintains data centers around the world.  For more information, visit www.highwinds.com.


In 2012, Publishers Must Question Everything About Their Businesses

In 2012, Publishers Must Question Everything About Their Businesses

January 11, 2012

Neither the form nor the function of a newspaper has changed much in the last hundred years, even with the advent of  digital media,  but that cannot continue. More than even the internet itself, the advent of mobile devices will drive change to both the product and the business model for online publishers. This will probably be a year of  much new product development in publishing.

Unlike in the past, when the newsroom and the publisher existed on two sides of a Chinese wall, today a publisher and his or her editorial organization must collaborate on product development. The reporters or content providers are not separate from the business side anymore, and everyone involved with a content site must understand how both the product and the business model work. The surviving publishers will be the ones who build new institutions that work within the new economics of online content.

Those economics are quite different than the old models, in which multiple revenue streams sustained newspapers. Micro payments will not be the salvation of newspapers, nor will pay walls — except in the case of extremely high value content such as that of the Wall Street Journal. Investigative reporting and covering local politics, the favorite beats of reporters, never did support newspapers.

Then how does a publisher meet the future? Not merely by tweaking the advertising model, but by tweaking the content model as well.

In this new world, old brands must differentiate themselves and create a stronger sense of value the reader in order to be valuable advertising platforms. At present, niche product-focused properties are winning the big ad dollars.  Even the most traditional publishers have to start sections that are of more interest to advertisers, although the advertisers will still have the preference for niche sites. The cover everything model of the traditional newspaper (gardening to gossip) may no longer make sense. Nor may long-form journalism in some: 75% of readers abandon long form articles before getting to the end. (My information on this comes from Richard Gingras, the Head of News Product at Google).

The battle for eyeballs is now waged on the users’ terms. Publishers must make use of data to understand their audiences and where they come from, which is in a constant state of flux: direct traffic to home pages is declining, down from 45% to 25% between 2009 and 2011. Search grew from 22% of traffic in 2009 to 33% in 2011, and social, which hardly registered as a referral source in 2009, sent 15% of traffic to publishers in 2011. And that will only increase. (These numbers are from Richard Gingras, Head of Product for Google and former CEO of Salon.com.)

The medium defines the message and its form, and thus the form of newspapers needs to be rethought completely. The atomic unit of content is now the story, not the site.  Newspapers don’t have  editions anymore. Now, articles, posts, facts, related docs, reader contributions, discussion, databases, relevant to the same story should be together on the same page. And instead of one-off efforts, good stories should use data to create persistent resources. The constant updating of stories brings users back to the site. And that’s how you sell advertising: against the story, not the site.

Publishers must design to leverage today’s technology and audience flows. In fact, the atomic unit of content was never the site itself, although most publishers came online thinking of themselves as portals.

What does that say about advertising above and below the fold? We believe that the fold comes from the news.

Fixing Newspapers’ Misguided Approach To Digital Ad Dollars

Fixing Newspapers’ Misguided Approach To Digital Ad Dollars

fastcompany.com
March 07, 2012
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I just finished reading the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism‘s study on the survival of newspapers. My conclusion: if online publishers don’t start to understand digital advertising and advertising technology more fully, they deserve to go out of business. According to the study, its “research reveals an industry that has not yet moved very far down the road toward a business model to replace the once-thriving legacy model–even though overall newspaper ad revenue has fallen by more than half in just a few years. The industry has pushed back against those losses by increasing the price of subscriptions. Even with that, overall newspaper revenue is down by more than 40% in the last decade.”

And it’s not because good new models don’t exist. It’s because newspaper culture is exceedingly slow to adopt them. For every dollar it gains in digital advertising, the newspaper industry loses about $7 in print. And that’s because newspapers still don’t understand how to explain or sell digital advertising, even 15 years in.

Advertising technology is still a highly specialized subject, and many newspaper ad reps don’t truly understand the new formats available to help them monetize assets that they hadn’t focused on before. They are still stuck on display ads above the fold, even though Google has begun to downgrade sites that place too much advertising at the top of the page between the consumer and content.

“The majority of papers studied focus most of their digital sales efforts on the two categories of digital advertising that are the largest but are not growing–conventional display (such as banner ads) and digital classified. Those categories account on average for 76% of digital revenue at the papers studied. These are the same two categories that have provided most of their revenue in print. And 92% of the papers studied said display was a major focus of their digital sales effort.”

But these are not necessarily the categories that work best for consumers. The response rate for display advertising has gone down over the years, while new forms of advertising (mobile, in-page video) are increasing. I’ve been lucky enough to work with an ad tech company that partners with publishers, and I have learned from them. They’ve been developing new formats in conjunction with Comscore, which has developed new measurement methods for ad campaigns.

These formats are called “InView,” and they only appear when a reader is there to see them. Thus, on a long page like the home page of Huffington Post, the ad will slide into view only when the reader scrolls down the page. Comscore’s new “Validated Campaign Essentials” tools measure campaigns not on whether ads have been served, but on whether they have been seen.

Knowing more about these new metrics and formats would give newspapers an opportunity to charge more for their digital advertising. Truthfully, ad agencies are not any better educated on this than publishers, and neither are brands. What appears to be needed in much more education.

In the technology community, where many of the new digital methodologies were invented, entrepreneurs know there are metrics to prove value, and they strive to master those metrics. Why have newspapers and ad agencies been so resistant?

I suspect 2012 will be a watershed year, partly because of the shift to mobile, which is happening faster than anyone would have predicted, borne along by the tremendous success of the iPad. ZEDO, the ad tech company I work with, can show you that news consumption on mobile devices soars on weekends, as people sit in the living room on the couch with their iPads, reading the news and watching the game.

You can advertise to these consumers, because they’re still reading the news–but first, you have to know how.

ZEDO Named to Online Trust Alliance Honor Roll

Microsoft announced Thursday that the next version of its browser, IE 10, will ship with the controversial “Do Not Track” feature turned on by default, a first among major browsers, creating a potential threat to online advertising giants.That includes one of Microsoft’s chief rivals — Google.The change could also threaten the still-nascent privacy standard, and prompt an ad industry revolt against it. Do Not Track doesn’t attempt to block cookies — instead it sends a message to every website you visit saying you prefer not to be tracked.

Wired’s article really points out how much online privacy has become a concern among internet users, and also of the ethical people who serve them.So it’s with great pleasure that we announce that ZEDO today announced it has been named to the Online Trust Alliance (OTA) 2012 Online Trust Honor Roll, based on a composite trust score of security and privacy measures at hundreds of online sites.

Designed to recognize leadership, the Honor Roll distinguishes ZEDO as a “North Star” to inspire others. As part of the 2012 study, released June 6, 2012, OTA analyzed the adoption of key security and privacy initiatives, providing benchmark reporting and comparisons between key industry sectors including leading internet retailers, FDIC Top 100 Banks, and social networking sites. Of the companies evaluated by the non-profit, member-based OTA, less than 30% made the grade.

This report examined over 1200 domains and privacy policies, 3600 web pages, and over 500 million emails.

The focus of the OTA Online Trust Honor Roll is to:

1. Recognize exemplary efforts of leading companies toward data and user protection, as security & privacy efforts, and highlight them as “North Stars.” Organizations on the Honor Roll manage data via security best practices while having transparent privacy practices.

2. Demonstrate OTA’s commitment towards providing prescriptive advice, tools and resources to businesses to enhance the security and privacy of the internet.

3. Underscore the importance of focusing on security and privacy holistically, and that individual security and privacy initiatives cannot be pursued in isolation.

4. Provide benchmark scoring, using the Online Trust Index (OTI) and reported data attributes, for companies to evaluate their own sites, for businesses to use in evaluating partners, and for consumers to consider when interacting or doing business online.

Since 2010, the OTA Online Trust Honor Roll has recognized organizations that follow best practices in data security and privacy.

As one of those organizations, it is part of our mission to serve and protect both our partners and their users. If you have any questions about online privacy rules and how you can comply, please feel free to contact us and we’ll help you understand them.

OTA Honor Roll

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