DigiTrust Universal Identity for Consumers is Here

All morning we’ve been listening to a webinar on  TAG, Ad-IDD, Time-based Metrics, and DigiTrust presented by IAB. By far the most interesting new development in the industry to us, is DigiTrust  a new 501c6 that is trying to fix identity and tracking problems for digital ads.

Many publishers have been concerned about the number of third party requests to their sites. They know those requests make the consumer experience poor.

So DigiTrust has come along to standardize the identifiers for consumers. Digitrust is a cloud service that  will offer a DigiTrust ID, and a DigiTrust consent stored in a 1st party cookie accessible by third parties. As a standardized ID for all, with DigiTrust, everybody uses the same ID for the consumer.  It’s just a common language they use with their partners, giving every party proof of consent, which is already necessary in Canada and Europe and may become essential in the US soon.

It eliminates the need for pixel syncs, makes pages load faster, levels the playing field between open web and walled gardens. Publishers need to start with putting a script that sets the identifier, establishes ID and consent, and can be passed through to all their suppliers. This standardized ID makes it possible to eliminate all the other Javascript calls and provides a level of control for the publisher. If you close down Javascript access, you benefit the entire ecosystem.

How it works: the consumer views a site with DigiTrust Javascript on any browser, JS then checks if a token and consent exist, and if not a consent notice is shown to the consumer via a window shade. Any subsequent page navigation is then directed through Digitrust ID. Digitrust stores no data, and empowers NO party with incremental data. It’s just a way to identify consumers once.

DigiTrust is aiming for for 100% consumer notice and consent and all Digitrust platforms and publishers must be part of a self-regulatory program (like TAG).

Publishers pay nothing. Platforms pay. Membership fees are one-time non recurring, with monthly API subscription fees for a decryption key. The more people involved, the more cost is spread among members.

So far, 60+ ad tech platforms have indicated interest,  with 20 already paying the fees. There are also 50+ premium publishers involved. But because of the holidays, deployments are not expected to happen until Q1. For information, contact Jordan @digitru.st Digitrust

A Moment of Gratitude

Every year at Thanksgiving, I become reflective about the year that is coming to a close. It has been a tumultuous one for our industry, and for the world as a whole, but as the year draws to a close there is still much to be thankful for at ZEDO.

First, ZEDO’s incredible product development team.  Not only do our products  stay abreast of and even ahead of the industry, but they perform so well that when a customer gives us a chance to test against a competitor, we always outperform. This while taking the high road in an industry still fraught with malware, fraud, and misrepresentation.

Second, our sales teams, who never sell vaporware, but get us in front of the right customers so we can help people achieve their financial objectives on both the publisher and the advertiser side.

Third, our highly regarded support and implementation teams, for which we always receive compliments. We have always been known for our support, and this will never change because our customer relationships are not transactional — they’re personal.

Next, our customers, whom we prefer to think of as our partners. Indeed, some of our customers have been on a very long journey with us from ad serving at the turn of the century to serving advertisers with high impact formats on a secure platform today.

Fourth, our thirty party partners, the technologies that externally verify our ads to make certain we keep our promises.

And next, the industry associations we support, like IAB and the Online Trust Association, who keep on working to bring our industry greater professionalism, better research, and higher standards.

Last, but certainly not least, everyone on the ZEDO team who keeps the lights on and makes us who we are. When my friends ask me why I went into the ad tech business, I answer that it’s because of the great people I’m able to work with all the time — bright minds in a fast-moving business.

I hope you all out there in the audience remember to feel grateful for your families, your teams, your health, and your continued presence on this great planet whether it is Thanksgiving in your country or not.

 

 

EMarketer Says Programmatic Has Won

The latest eMarketer roundup on the programmatic marketplace tells us that more than two thirds of all digital display advertising will be bought programmatically this year.

In 2016, US programmatic digital display ad spending will reach $22.10 billion. That’s a jump of 39.7% over last year, and represents 67.0% of total digital display ad spending in the US.

It’s hard to believe that programmatic, for all intents and purposes, is only about three years old. It took a while for marketers to figure out that it was a work flow solution and was safe to use. It was also a bit complex, but now everyone’s comfortable with it, and pleased with its efficiency. This year, programmatic will take over mobile, and next year will be the big year for programmatic mobile video.

Mobile is driving growth of programmatic ad spending. This year, mobile programmatic spending will reach $15.45 billion in the US, representing 69.0% of all programmatic digital display ad spending. Next year, mobile video programmatic spending will exceed its desktop counterpart for the first time.

With respect to programmatic video, 2016 will be a pivotal year. More than half of all digital video ad spending in the US will be programmatic. This year, programmatic video ad spending will reach $5.51 billion, representing 56.0% of total digital video ad spending. That figure represents in turn 24.9% of total programmatic digital display ad spending.

Next year will be the tipping point for programmatic mobile video ads, as mobile surpasses desktop for the first time. By 2017, programmatic mobile video ad spending will reach $3.89 billion, representing 51.0% of total programmatic ad spending in the US. By comparison, programmatic desktop based video ad spending will reach $3.73 billion, dropping to 49.0% of total programmatic digital display ad spending…

That being said, programmatic isn’t growing quite as quickly as it has in the past. We think that’s because, although media planners may recognize that programmatic is efficient, there’s a difference between efficient and effective. So far, there isn’t enough experience with mobile video ads, programmatic or direct, to prove how and where they’re as effective as other channels.

And the landscape is further complicated by header bidding, which has been gaining momentum and will be rolled out by Facebook’s ad network this month.

2017 Will Bring Differences in IAB Ad Formats

Strap on your safety belts, digital advertising will be very different in 2017. The IAB is in the process of creating new formats for online ads, reflecting both the LEAN principles it introduced last year and new aspect ratios that take into account cross-device campaigns. The new formats are in response to the shift to mobile, the demand of brand marketers for cross-device integrated campaigns, and new technologies such as mixed, augmented, and virtual reality, which debuted this year and will take over the market in fall 2017 when Apple releases its rumored tenth anniversary iPhone.

One other change that is suggested by these guidelines: we’re not going for scale and reach in the future. We are going for precise targeting that can be measured for attribution. Even in branding, we’re after the right customer, not just random eyeballs.

The draft is open for public comment until Nov. 28 and can be downloaded here. ZEDO has worked with the Online Trust Association to comment on the draft from a privacy, security, and malware perspective.

The following IAB Tech Lab member companies were part of the working group that created this draft: Aarki Grey Advertising Sizmek ABC TV Network GroupM Spongecell AdCade Gruuv Interactive Startapp Adelphic, Inc. Havoc Sublime Skinz AdGear Technologies, Inc. Ipsos TapAd Ansible J. Walter Thompson U.S.A., Inc. Team AOL AOL Kargo The New York Times Company AOL Platforms Mashable The Walt Disney Company Beachfront Media MediaCom The Weather Company, an IBM Business Bloomberg Merkle Inc Undertone CBS Interactive Micro Cube Digital Limited Unity Technologies Celtra Microsoft Advertising Unruly Cox Media Group MING Utility & Entertainment Group USATODAY.com Cyber Ideas Monotype Vertebrae Dow Jones & Company (The Wall Street Journal) Flexitive Vibrant Media ESPN.com Ogilvy Xaxis Flashtalking PageFair Yahoo Flipboard PGA TOUR YieldMo Flite PointRoll Zillow Forbes Media R/GA Gannett Responsive Ads Google Saatchi & Saatchi NY .

Among many other changes, the new Dynamic Standards vary according to weather and geography, as well as demographics. Also, pixels are gone, replaced by aspect ratios, so the ads can be used across screens.

Developed by the IAB Tech Lab, the revised portfolio is based on HTML5 technology and comprised of flexible display ads, mobile ads, video ads, native ads, and introduces guidelines for new content experiences like virtual reality and social messaging ads.

The IAB also expects ads to contain emojis and stickers. Guaranteed will be user choice according to the LEAN Principles of lightweight, encrypted, AdChoice supported, and non-invasive advertising.

In some ways, getting rid of pixels will make it easier to create one piece of creative and deploy it across screens. Although we already support this capability, we’re in the process of getting absolutely every piece of this IAB guideline into our product roadmap so we’re ready for it when it comes. Because we are known for fundamentally better advertising, we want to continue to lead the market.

Facebook Metrics Show Danger of Buying in Walled Gardens

Nothing says more about the danger of buying only from walled gardens than Facebook’s recent admission that people were not watching as much video on the social network as it had  reported. The average video on Facebook was counted as “viewed” after as little as three seconds, but Facebook didn’t calculate in the number of people who don’t watch video on the site at all.

Facebook apparently made a division error of the kind any normal human could make,

Instead of dividing the total time spent watching a video by the total number of people who watched that video, Facebook’s metric reflected the total time spent watching divided by the number of views the video had generated. With Facebook counting views at three seconds, that meant anyone who had seen just a glimpse of the video was not getting represented in the metric. In fact, Facebook told advertisers that its metric was off by 60 to 80 percent, according to The [Wall Street] Journal.

Advertisers seemed not to care, revealing they they don’t buy on time watched, but on either 10-second views or completed views. In this case. Facebook’s being wrong didn’t seem to cost advertisers money. But they should care, because it turns out 80% of Facebook users don’t watch video at all. Brands looking to shift large budgets from TV to digital video can’t do that safely until the know what their return on investment will be similar. It would be more advantageous if buyers spent more with independent publishers, who are closer to their audiences. Facebook’s audience is simply too large to count properly, and too uncommitted to give good results.

Most independent publishers are forced to accept some kind of third party verification of their views, but Facebook does not use third party vendors; it does its own analytics internally. After this admission, self-attestation will not work anymore for Facebook. It must allow in the same third party vendors, ComScore, Nielsen, or someone else, that the rest of the publishing world uses to tell its story.

For publishers, this inflation of the video watching time is worrisome at best, because most publishers felt they had to pay ball with Facebook and when the platform put its emphasis on video, publishers scrambled to provide video content. But all these publisher resources would be wasted if no one were watching. Because of the way advertisers pay, they can afford to wait and see if their ads work. Content publishers have no such luxury. Once they throw money at an expensive initiative like video, they would like to be sure they’re getting paid.

It will be a while until all this sorts itself out, and we figure out whether mobile video deserves the dollars being pulled out of trusty old TV.

 

We Lead in Outstream for a Reason

S1The biggest complaint in the advertising industry as we drop further into Q4, its busiest season, is the lack of video inventory. Everybody wants to run video ads, because video completion rates are higher than the CTRs on banner ads. Especially on mobile, consumers seem to have more patience with video ads than display ads. However, when they speak about video inventory many brands still mean content on high-trafficked video sites like YouTube on which they can run pre-roll. There is indeed a scarcity of that.

However, pre-roll is not the best way to achieve results with video ads, as many other companies have already discovered. The unfortunately- named “outstream,” video ads on text sites are the best performers.

In this department, ZINC is the market leader, having been the first to market with this format.  We launched what we called inArticle video almost three years ago, before the term outstream even existed, and we also initiated the term “polite” for these ads, because they only came into view only when a reader scrolled down to them, and they were also easy to close or scroll past. As  a result of the precautions we take, our ads are not intrusive.

Not only that, we never have used auto-play sound, another reason we feel comfortable calling these ad formats “polite.”

We constantly win buys away from our competitors (and there aren’t many), because we get higher viewability scores with resulting higher rates for publishers. Even the competitors are asking us how we win so many good buys.

Here’s how: we have a better format, better technology, and a better premium publisher network. We have tested our viewability with third parties, and we’re at 93%. To be a market leader, you not only have to be a technology leader, you also have to be cognizant of consumer attitudes, and you have to run on only premium publishers. That’s us.

Yes, this is a self-serving post. Every once in a while we have to sneak one in, because not enough people know what we do.

 

 

The New Rules for Native Advertising

As a publisher, now do you avoid sullying your brand with the “slew of sewage” most editorial writers think comes with native advertising, and yet keep some of the revenue that flows from native for yourself?  For the Times, known for over a century as “the gray lady,” the reputational damage of going native could have been disastrous, and yet the category has grown so quickly that there’s no way not to participate if it wants to survive.

So the Times jumped awkwardly into native, and now its agency had $35 million in revenue last year, and will create 100 campaigns this year. Yet, the Times does not have the feel or the reputation of Buzzfeed, whose branded content is often offensive to more sophisticated audiences. Its native content is still recognizable as being from the Times.

Here are some good tips that the New York Times has learned from experience that can be applied by other publishers.

1)First, if you establish an in-house creative unit to produce branded content that will run in your publication, give it a separate name: the Times’ unit is called T Brand Studio, and calls itself an agency.

2)Next, begin with an innovative campaign to run in the publication that showcases both the agency’s and the publication’s multimedia capabilities. In the case of the Times, a campaign for Netflix won over some of the wary Times newsroom occupants.

3)Match the quality of the branded content with the quality of the editorial content.

4)Bear in mind that advertisers don’t necessarily need publishers to get reach anymore, but if you have high levels of engagement from your readers, you can sell your advertising for higher prices.  Reach is going out of style in favor of engagement. The Times’ subscription model promotes reader engagement, and that helps the ad sales, too.

5)Do things that Facebook cannot do. Scale and data are Facebook’s purview, but narrow targeting is best at a publication.

6)Programmatic, video, and content-based ads are growth pillars, and display is not. Focus on the areas that grow. Mixed reality could come next.

7)Raise the bar on innovation in accordance with the specific KPI for the brand. What kind of NBDB (Never Been Done Before) campaign, will get the CMO on the cover of AdAge? Those are the kinds of KPIs brands come to an agency with.

8) Raise the bar on quality to match that of your publication.

9) Label it properly so if visitors choose to engage with it they know that they’re engaging with.

10) If a brand asks for creative that can be run elsewhere, you’ve hit the jackpot. You are then a fully-functioning agency, and can be an actual profit center.

 

 

 

TAG Releases Names of First Hundred Participants

It’s a very exciting time in the digital media business. The Trustworthy Accountability Group’s effort to clean up the supply chain has been gathering momentum all year. We’ve (ZEDO) been working on the Business Transparency Committee, and on the IQG (Internet Quality Guidelines) working group. During this first year, over 100 companies, most of them familiar names in the advertising industry, have gone through the process of registration as trustworthy partners, and have either self-attested or been audited on their business practices. All the major advertising holding companies have already been through the process, which has become more common for anyone who buys or sells advertising. In the future, the process will extent to intermediaries.

There is now an accepted transfer protocol for the transmission of registration IDs and payment IDs, and these have begun being passed back and forth during automated transactions.

“The TAG Registry is the foundation for the full range of TAG’s programs to fight fraud, reduce ad-supported piracy, block malware, and increase transparency in the digital advertising ecosystem,” said Mike Zaneis, CEO of TAG. “Through the TAG Registry and use of TAG-IDs, companies can tell which of their industry partners have taken the necessary steps to verify their business as a legitimate digital ad industry participant. When the TAG Registry is combined with the Payment ID system, a floodlight of transparency will illuminate the digital advertising ecosystem, and criminals will have no place left to hide.”

The TAG Registry is one of two parts of the interlocking “Verified by TAG” Program designed to fight digital ad-related crime and increase transparency across the digital ad ecosystem. The other core element of the program, TAG’s Payment ID Protocol, helps ensure that payments made in the digital ad ecosystem are made only to legitimate companies. The Payment ID Protocol enables intermediaries to add a unique identifier for each participant in the supply chain, allowing companies to monitor their ad campaigns and “follow the money” to see who is receiving money for each advertising impression.

Following the money will be the best way for media planners and publishers, as well as ad exchanges and ad servers, to be sure they are dealing with quality partners. The Trustworthy Accountability Group was created to spur transformational improvement at scale across the digital advertising ecosystem, focusing on four core areas: eliminating fraudulent traffic, combating malware, fighting ad-supported Internet piracy to promote brand integrity, and promoting brand safety through greater transparency.

 

For Mobile App Ads, Innovative Formats Work Better

The mobile app development industry is alive and well, according to an inMobi survey from earlier in the year, and despite the roller coaster ride in advertising, it’s still the most popular way for developers to monetize their inventory. However, the average developer worldwide makes almost nothing on a single app, and only 15% have crossed the 1000 download threshhold. If this is true, why do people continue to develop apps?

We think developers can do better, but they have to use some more innovative formats.

App development is a young industry, and most of the people in it have been doing it for less than four years. Only a third of app developers have been in the industry for three years. Most of the mobile app dev firms are small, and many are making apps for other businesses, rather than trying to monetize their own apps. In fact, 47% of mobile app developers are solo-preneurs. Many of them told inMobi that they were developing apps for fun, rather than for fortune. No wonder games and entertainment constitute over 70% of the apps developed. And no wonder they are not as savvy about advertising as they need to be.

When you get up to 1-3 apps in either the Play Store or the IOS App Store, if you play your cards correctly, revenue can increase. It probably isn’t surprising to find that 42% of the respondents had 1-3 apps in the Google Play store, while only 28% had apps in IOS. In the US, we often forget that Apple is such a small piece of the global overall device market, because it has an outsized influence locally. Android is also a better place to learn how to develop an app than IOS.

Making money is the biggest issue for application developers, as it is for all web publishers. 55% of developers make $1000 per month, and monthly average mobile app revenue globally is under $6K. There’s new research that shows a decline in app downloads around the world, and the average phone user interacts daily with no more than a dozen apps.The average monthly per-app revenue is in the range of $5k to $11k depending on the platform. Windows Phone is the highest money-maker at $11.4k per month per app, although it is only used by 21% of developers. North American developers lead in both downloads and revenue over both APAC and Europe.

Advertising is the most bankable app business revenue model;  7 out of 10 app developers use mobile advertising to monetize their apps currently and 18% of them plan to use mobile advertising in future. Used correctly, it can generate good revenue, but we believe too many developers are naive about advertising and choose either the wrong ad network or the wrong ad formats.

For example, banner ads and interstitials are still preferred by app developers despite the the fact that consumers do not like them. Response to banners has gone down steadily, and interstitials are under pressure from consumers who now have the capacity to run ad blockers on mobile. Video, however, has taken off, and video advertising such as our inArticle format, works well. Our SwipeUp for mobile, an innovative new format we came up with this year, has also taken off.

If you are an app developer, it’s worth talking to a platform that knows how best to connect you with advertisers who can get you the revenue you desire.

 

 

On Being the “Tortoise”

I read another post recently about the Armageddon coming in the ad tech space. There are still 3000 companies on the Lumascape, and the author of the post refers to “obliteration rather than consolidation.”

That’s because the capital markets are drying up, and most of the companies in the space rely on outside capital. Those should go away. If you haven’t gotten to sustainability by now, and you haven’t been acquired, you are probably going to be out of luck.

ZEDO does not rely on outside capital.  That’s why we aren’t as large as some of the VC funded companies. On the other hand, we have had far fewer hiccups along the way, even as the industry changed. We were founded in 1999, and we have learned to stay nimble and responsive.

We are funding the company the old-fashioned way, with good products that bring us customers. We have the ability to look out into the future, which is what our marketing department does, rather than simply create pretty pieces and figure out how to spend more money sponsoring conferences.

When we see a customer need, we have a strong development team to respond to it, and we put it on our product road map. That’s now we came to develop SwipeUp, our mobile ad format. SwipeUp came from a meeting we had between marketing and development to talk about formats mobile consumers would tolerate and respond to. It accompanies our already successful inArticle video format.

Our goal is to create formats and innovations that are fundamentally better advertising, not to make VCs happy with exponential growth. In the advertising industry, if you grow to fast in one direction, it makes it harder to pivot to the next change. We really want to remain responsive, and use our technology leadership on behalf of customers.

We have always been known for our outstanding support as well.

Now that we are private platform for buyers and sellers with a clean supply chain, we are interested in meeting people who want to deal with a “real” company, rather than a creation of marketing and PR that’s out ahead of product and customer service.

I rarely write one of these posts about our virtues, but as I look around at the landscape and read the industry trades I can’t help but feel fortunate that we chose to be the tortoise.